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Let food be your medicine

 

 

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 Minerals

 Hazards

 

MINERALS

The term minerals refers to elements in their simple inorganic form. In nutrition they are commonly referred to as mineral elements or inorganic nutrients. Minerals are vital to health. Like vitamins, protein and other organic compounds, minerals (inorganic compounds) are essential for regulating and building the trillions of living cells which make up the body. Minerals are especially important for intracellular electrical messages which tells cells when to replicate and when to die if abnormal. Cancer is caused by these messages not being present and is often due to mineral deficiencies. Infection and damage can also stop these messages getting through to these abnormal cells. Many prescribed medications, alcohol and other toxins can block absorption and cause a huge loss of essential minerals through the urine and perspiration.

The body is made from the following elements and their atomic numbers are included in brackets. The purpose or cause and effect these elements have in the human body and the natural sources of each one can be found on their dedicated pages.

 

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The body also contains small amounts of each of the following elements.

Many common foods, humans already consume, contain fair amounts of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and zinc. But it is also particularly important to add foods to the diet that contain barium, bismuth, boron, bromine, caesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, fluoride, germanium, gold, iodine, iridium, lithium, molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen, platinum, rhodium, rubidium, selenium, silicon, silver, strontium, sulphur, vanadium and tin at least once a fortnight.

This is especially important for those doing any strenuous activities, taking any medications or recreational drugs, drinking alcohol regularly or those suffering from diarrhoea and fevers or illnesses such as cancer, HIV/AIDS or immune system, bone, neurological or degenerative disorders and pregnant women. Everyone else should strive to include these foods at least once a month to ensure the correct balance of minerals in the body and prevent any ailments developing. Athletes and anyone that partakes in intense physical activities are often lacking in minerals as they perspire profusely but do not replace lost minerals so they should consume plenty of the foods highest in minerals listed below.

Because legumes, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains contain high levels of phytic acid which inhibits absorption of minerals such as calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc it is important to soak, sprout or ferment them before consumption.
For more information see Phytic acid.

Minerals cannot be made in the body and must be obtained in the diet. Pure unrefined sea salt, mineral water, chlorella, spirulina, hemp seeds, oily fish, halibut, krill oil, shellfish, octopus, squid, sea weed and sea vegetables like kelp are the only certain way to gain all the vital elements required by the body because both modern farming and food processing techniques have stripped the soil and food of these vital elements. Naturally occurring, nutrient-rich soil is becoming increasingly rare. Eons of vegetation growth and intensive modern farming techniques have brought many of the earth’s minerals to the surface where they have been washed away. Synthesised fertilisers are routinely applied to farms and fields where minerals have been depleted. But man-made fertilisers provide only enough mineral substance to support basic plant life. Numerous trace minerals essential to human life do not get replenished.

Trace minerals do not exist by themselves but in relationship to one another. Too much of one trace element can lead to imbalances in others and most trace elements need to be in ionic form to be well absorbed in the small intestine. Therefore taking mineral supplements is not the answer. Only readily digestible minerals from natural food sources will provide optimum health and protection.

A typical plant makes its own food from raw materials and a typical animal eats its food. For plants, these raw materials include soil-based inorganic mineral salts. Soil-based mineral salts can be depleted through synthetic fertilisers, herbicides and pesticides, as well as repeatedly growing crops on the same soil. This is why so many people are often unwittingly deficient in certain minerals especially those whose lifestyles deplete their bodily supplies faster and more often such as those on medications, those that drink alcohol regularly and those participating in high energy activates such as sports and dancing or those whose system is less able to absorb minerals due to illness or old age.

Minerals taken as supplements are industrial chemicals made from processing rocks with one or more acids. The consumption of this “other half” of the mineral compound is not only unnatural, it can lead to toxicity concerns. Humans were designed to eat food and to get their minerals from foods. Foods do not naturally contain minerals bound to substances such as picolinic acid, carbonates, oxides, phosphates, etc. When supplementation is required it should be in the form of natural foods only.

Body cells receive the essential food elements through the blood stream. They must, therefore, be properly nourished with an adequate supply of all the essential minerals for the efficient functioning of the body. They help maintain the volume of water necessary to life processes in the body. They help draw chemical substances into and out of the cells and they keep the blood and tissue fluid from becoming either too acidic or too alkaline.

The importance of inorganic minerals, like organic vitamins, is illustrated by the fact that there are over 50,000 enzymes in the body which direct growth and energy and each enzyme has different minerals, vitamins and other chemicals associated with it. Each of the essential food minerals does a specific job in the body and some of them do extra work, in teams, to keep body cells healthy and eliminate abnormal cells. Although as yet, it has not been discovered what the functions of some elements have in the human body, many of these 118 elements are present and many have a purpose of some kind. Those in blue are linked to their known functions, deficiencies, toxicity and natural food sources sections on this page.

Minerals thus play a highly important role in every bodily function and are present in every human cell. Although the amount needed may be small, without even the trace of the mineral, dysfunction is bound to occur at some level in the body. A zinc deficiency may show up in ridged fingernails with white spots. Lack of sulphur can cause lack-lustre hair and dull-looking skin. Less obvious deficiencies may surface as fatigue, irritability, loss of memory, nervousness, depression and weakness. Minerals also interact with vitamins. Magnesium, for instance, must be present in the body for utilisation of B complex, vitamin C and vitamin E. Sulphur also works with the B complex vitamins. The body needs all the trace minerals in proper balance. A constant lack of minerals in the body results in infection and disease and serious disorders of processes including diabetes, bone disorders, organ failures and cancer.

For more information and natural sources see:

Coffee, alcohol, excess refined salt, strenuous exercise, stress, sugar and many drugs can rob the body of minerals or make them ineffective. Industrial pollutants cause toxic minerals to enter the body. Minerals at toxic levels also have the effect of destroying the usefulness of other vitamins and minerals. Exercise improves the activity of certain vitamins and minerals while stress and fatigue work against them. Too much exercise, however, can cause deficiencies in minerals if they are not replaced.

A well-balanced diet provides as abundance of minerals and vitamins. In refining cereals, grains, flour, salt and sugar, the food industry has robbed them of their natural vitamins and minerals. Some dietary sources of these nutrients are whole grains, cereals, bran and germ. It is the bran and germ which are removed in processing. To obtain a balance of nutrients, it is , therefore, necessary to avoid refined and processed foods and consume far more organic whole fruit, herbs, legumes, nuts, sea foods, seeds, spices and vegetables which are an excellent source of minerals and vitamins.

 

Electrolytes

 

Electrolytes are the smallest of chemicals that are important for the cells in the body to function and allow the body to work. Electrolytes especially chloride, magnesium, potassium and sodium are critical in allowing cells to generate energy, maintain the stability of their walls and to function in general. They generate electricity, contract muscles, move water and fluids within the body and participate in myriad other activities.


The concentration of electrolytes in the body is controlled by a variety of hormones, most of which are manufactured in the kidney and the adrenal glands. Sensors in specialised kidney cells monitor the amount of sodium, potassium and water in the bloodstream. The body functions in a very narrow range of normal and it is hormones like renin (made in the kidney), angiotensin (from the lung, brain and heart), aldosterone (from the adrenal gland), and anti-diuretic hormone (from the pituitary gland) that keep the electrolyte balance within those normal limits. Keeping electrolyte concentrations in balance also includes stimulating the thirst mechanism when the body gets dehydrated.

Mineral water

Mineral water is a healthy alternative to tap water as it usually contains trace elements that are essential to human health. Depending upon it's source it can naturally contain minerals such as bicarbonate, calcium, fluoride, lithium, magnesium, potassium, silica, sodium and strontium. Water from natural springs, wells and mountain lakes contains minerals which are in the rocks through which it flows and these minerals all have a purpose within the human body. Modern day farming techniques have leeched many minerals from the soil so non organic farmed food is often lacking in them, especially magnesium. The best way to ingest the some of the minerals needed daily is through drinking mineral water, whether carbonated or still, everyday.

Drinking mineral water is especially important for the elderly and those on medications which can force the body to expel essential minerals in the urine such as diuretics.

Tap water has little mineral content except fluoride and chlorine which are added artificially and, in many developed countries, also contains traces of medications administered to humans such as hormone replacement drugs and the contraceptive pill.

Read about the dangers of drinking boiled or distilled water, why it is necessary to prevent heart attacks and signs of a deficiency of water in the body here: Water


A - Z OF MINERALS

 

NOTE: Some nutrients in this section are measured in g which is the abbreviation for microgram and is equivalent  to a unit of mass equal to one millionth (110−6) of a gram or one thousandth (110−3) of a milligram. One IU is the biological equivalent of 0.3 μg or 0.3 micrograms.
 

See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

A

 

Aluminium

Aluminium is a mineral, with the atomic number of 13. Read more about Aluminium

Source of aluminium

  • Sumac

  • Tea

  • Teff

  • Whole grains

Arsenic

Arsenic is a heavy metal, with the atomic number of 33. Read more about Arsenic

Sources of arsenic

  • Apple juice, glues, pigments and wine.

  • Milk and dairy products, beef, pork, poultry and cereal.

  • Many water sources in the world have high levels of arsenic in them, both due to normal arsenic leaching out of the ground and from mining and industrial waste.

  • Arsenic is also often found in rice, which may be a potentially serious source of exposure in certain at-risk populations (especially children).

See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

B

 

Barium

 

Barium is a mineral with the atomic number 56. Read more about Barium

 

Natural sources of barium

 

  • Beetroot
  • Black walnut
  • Bran
  • Brazil nuts
  • Cocoa beans
  • Eggs
  • Grapes
  • Milk
  • Peanuts
  • Pecans
  • Potatoes
  • Prunes
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Swiss cheese
  • Soya beans
  • Sumac
  • Tea
  • Teff
  • Tomatoes
  • Tap water (in some locations)

 

Bicarbonate

 

See how bicarbonate can help reduce acidity in the body to treat and prevent many health disorders: Bicarbonate

Bismuth

Bismuth is a heavy metal similar to lead and arsenic. It is a mineral, with the atomic number 83. Read more about Bismuth

Highest natural sources of bismuth

  • Chaga mushrooms

  • Kelp

  • Maca root

  • Seaweed

Boron

 

Boron is a chemical element with the atomic number 5. Read more about Boron

Natural sources of boron

  • Almonds

  • Apple peel (red)

  • Avocados

  • Bananas

  • Broccoli

  • Carrots

  • Chia seeds

  • Chick peas

  • Grapes (red)

  • Hemp seeds

  • Honey

  • Legumes

  • Onions

  • Oranges

  • Pear skins

  • Prunes

  • Raisins

  • Potato skins (red)

  • Parsnips

  • Sumac

  • Swede

  • Sweet potato skins (red)

  • Teff

  • Walnuts

Bromine

Bromine has the atomic number of 35. Read more about Bromine

Natural sources of bromine

  • Algae

  • Kelp

  • Seaweed

  • Sea salt

  • Sumac

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See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

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Cadmium

 

Cadmium has the atomic number of 48. Read more about Cadmium

Sources of cadmium

  • Coffee

  • Refined flour

  • Rice

  • Sugar

  • Root vegetables

  • Shellfish

  • Sumac

  • Tea

  • Tobacco and cannabis smoke

Cadmium is also a component of alloys, used in electrical materials and is present in burning coal, ceramics, dental materials, storage batteries and water pipes.

Caesium

Caesium has the atomic number of 55. Read more about Cadmium

Natural sources of caesium

  • Fruit

  • Legumes

  • Milk

  • Mineral water

  • Nuts

  • Oily fish

  • Seeds

  • Shellfish

  • Vegetables

Calcium

Calcium has the atomic number of 20 and the human body needs calcium more than any other mineral.

Hypercalcaemia

Hypercalcaemia occurs when there is high levels of calcium in the blood and muscles and can lead to irreversible kidney damage. Taking high doses of vitamin D supplements can cause this.

Hypocalcaemia

Hypocalcaemia is the medical term for low serum calcium levels in the blood.

Read more about Calcium

Highest sources of calcium in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Dried herbs such as basil, dill, marjoram, rosemary and thyme 2113 mg

  • Cheese such as goat’s, gruyere, parmesan, Romano and Swiss 1376 mg

  • Sesame seeds 975 mg

  • Mozzarella cheese 961 mg

  • Tinned fish with bones such as sardines, mackerel and pilchards 383 mg

  • Tofu 372 mg

  • Almonds 264 mg

  • Flaxseeds 255 mg

  • Anchovies 232 mg

  • Chlorella 221mg

  • Mussels 180 mg

  • Oysters 170 mg

  • Brazil nuts 160 mg

  • Prawns 150 mg

  • Tripe 150 mg

  • Scallops, spirulina and watercress 120 mg

  • Whole milk and whole yoghurt 113 mg

  • Chinese cabbage 105 mg

  • Dark green leafy vegetables such as dandelion greens, kale, spinach, Swiss chard and turnip greens  99 mg

  • Okra 77 mg

  • Soya beans 75 mg

  • Boneless fish such as bass, herring, pike, perch, pollock and rainbow trout 74 mg

  • Kidney beans 70 mg

  • Eggs 60 mg

  • Broccoli 47 mg

 

Carbon

 

Carbon is a chemical element with the atomic number 6 that is found in various compounds within the human body but not in its purest form. Read more about Carbon

Chlorine

Chlorine is a chemical element with the atomic number of 13. Read more about Chlorine

Natural sources of chlorine

  • Berries

  • Cheese

  • Coconut

  • Egg yolk

  • Green leafy vegetables

  • Lentils

  • Milk

  • Mineral water

  • Olives

  • Rice

  • Radishes

  • Sea salt

  • Tomatoes

Chromium

Chromium is a trace mineral element with the atomic number 24. Read more about Chromium

Highest sources of chromium in micrograms per 100 grams

  • Brewer's yeast 400 g

  • Mussels 128 g

  • Brazil nut 100 g

  • Oyster 57 g

  • Dates (dried) 29 g

  • Pears 27 g

  • Shrimp 26 g

  • Wholemeal flour 21 g

  • Tomatoes 20 g

  • Mushrooms 17 g

  • Broccoli 16 g

  • Barley (wholegrain) 13 g

  • Hazelnuts 12 g

  • Maize (wholegrain) 9 g

  • Egg yolk 6 g

  • Anchovies, herring 2 g

NOTE: One μg is one microgram.

Cobalt

Cobalt is a trace mineral element with the atomic number of 27. Read more about Cobalt

Natural sources of cobalt

  • Broccoli

  • Clams

  • Green leafy vegetables

  • Nuts

  • Oily fish

  • Organ meats

  • Oysters

  • Spinach

  • Whole grains

Copper

Copper is a trace element with the atomic number of 29. Read more about Copper

Highest sources of copper in milligrams per 200 calorie serving

  • Clams 49 mg

  • Calf’s liver 17 mg

  • Beef 17 mg

  • Oysters (raw) 13 mg

  • Lamb 10 mg

  • Duck 9 mg

  • Himalayan salt crystals 6 mg

  • Sea salt (unrefined) 6 mg

  • Spirulina 5 mg

  • Chlorella 5 mg

  • Squid 4 mg

  • Lobster 4 mg

  • Mushrooms (Crimini) 4 mg

  • Mushrooms (Shiitake) 3 mg

  • Basil 3 mg

  • Cocoa (organic) 3 mg

  • Capers 3 mg

  • Mineral water 3 mg

  • Apple cider vinegar 3 mg

  • Chamomile tea 3 mg

  • Lemons 3 mg

  • Chicory greens 3 mg

  • Turnip greens 3 mg

  • Cashew nuts 2.2 mg

  • Crab 2 mg

  • Squid 2 mg

  • Potatoes (with skins) 2 mg

  • Coriander 2 mg

  • Asparagus 2 mg

  • Swiss chard 2 mg

  • Winged beans 2 mg

  • Beetroot greens 2mg

NOTE: Copper is found in most foods containing iron.

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See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

F

Fluorine and fluoride

Fluorine is a chemical element with the atomic number 9. Fluoride is an inorganic, monatomic anion of fluorine. An anion is an atom or a molecule which is negatively charged which means it has more electrons than protons. Read more about Fluoride

Natural sources of fluoride

  • Algae and seaweed

  • Apples

  • Beetroot

  • Cabbage

  • Cantaloupe

  • Cauliflower

  • Dulse

  • Eggs

  • Garlic

  • Goat’s milk

  • Green tea

  • Melon

  • Mineral water

  • Pistachio nuts

  • Seaweed

  • Spinach

  • Tap water

  • Tea

  • Watercress

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See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

G

Germanium

Germanium is a trace mineral with the atomic number of 32. Read more about Germanium

Natural sources of germanium

  • Algae and seaweed

  • Aloe vera

  • Ashitaba

  • Beef

  • Bran

  • Chaga mushrooms

  • Comfrey

  • Garlic

  • Ginseng

  • Hemp seeds

  • Milk

  • Rabbit

  • Seeds

  • Spirulina

  • Suma

  • Vegetables

  • Venison

  • Whole grains

Gold

Gold is a mineral element with the atomic number of 79. Read more about Gold

Natural sources of gold

  • Aubergine (skins)

  • Beetroot

  • Black grapes

  • Grape seeds

  • Plums

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See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

H

Heavy metal contamination

 

Industrial use of heavy metals elements has caused spillage and leakages into the environment that have contaminated food and water resources and is cause for concern as they are toxic to animals and humans and can lead to many serious conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, when levels increase in the human body. For further information and natural ways to reduce and eliminate heavy metals from the body see Heavy metal dangers

See also Metal oestrogens

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See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

I

Iodine

Iodine is a chemical element with the atomic number of 53. Read more about Iodine

Highest sources of iodine in micrograms per serving listed in brackets

  • Chlorella, dulse, spirulina algae and kelp (1 tablespoon or 5 g) 750 g

  • Himalayan crystal salt (half a gram) 450 g

  • Cranberries (4 oz or 114 g) 400 g

  • Lobster (3.53 oz or 100 g) 100 g

  • Cod (3 oz or 85 g) 99 g

  • Plain yoghurt (8 oz or 227 g) 75 g

  • Seafood, clams etc (3.53 oz or 100 g) 66 g

  • Potato (one medium size) 60 g

  • Milk (8oz or 227 g) 59 g

  • Shrimp (3 oz or 85 g) 35 g

  • Navy beans (4 oz or 114 g) 32 g

  • Turkey (3 oz or 85 g) 34 g

  • Anchovies (100 g) 30 g

  • One medium sized egg 24 g

  • Cheddar cheese (1 oz or 28 g) 23 g

  • Tinned tuna (3 oz or 85 g) 17 g

  • Gouda cheese (1.42 oz or 40 g) 14 g

  • Prunes (five) 13 g

  • Strawberries (8 oz or 227 g) 13 g

  • Butter beans (4 oz or 114 g) 8 g

  • Lean beef (3 oz or 85 g) 8 g

  • Apple juice (8oz or 227 g) 7 g

  • Peas (4 oz or 114 g) 3 g

  • Green beans (4 oz or 114 g) 3 g

  • Banana (one medium) 3 g

NOTE:  One g is one microgram.

Iridium

Iridium is a chemical element with the atomic number of 77. Read more about Iridium

Natural sources of iridium

  • Almonds

  • Carrots

  • Flaxseed oil

  • Grape seeds

  • Green tea

  • Shiitake mushrooms

  • Watercress

Iron

Iron is an important trace mineral, with the atomic number of 26, and is part of the vital activity of the blood and glands.

Haemochromatosis

Haemochromatosis is a hereditary disease characterised by excessive absorption of dietary iron resulting in abnormal high levels of total body iron stores. Excess iron accumulates in tissues and organs disrupting their normal function. The hereditary form of the disease is most common among those of Northern European ancestry, in particular those of British or Irish descent, with a prevalence of one in 200. For those patients extra iron will likely worsen their symptoms.

Read more about Iron

Highest sources of iron in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Black pepper, marjoram, parsley, spinach, thyme 224 mg

  • Spirulina 29 mg

  • Clams 28 mg

  • Bran 19 mg

  • Liver 18 mg

  • Squash and pumpkin seeds 15 mg

  • Caviar 12 mg

  • Hemp seeds 9.6 mg

  • Sun dried tomatoes 9 mg

  • Cashew nuts 6.7 mg

  • Dried apricot 6.3 mg

  • Wheat 6.3 mg

  • Black strap molasses 4.7 mg

  • Prunes 3.5 mg

  • Artichokes 3.4 mg

  • Prawns 3.1 mg

  • Lean beef 2.9 mg

  • Turkey 2.3mg

  • Raisins 1.9 mg

  • Chicken 1.3 mg

  • Tuna 1.3 mg

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See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

L

Lithium

Lithium is a nutritionally essential trace element with the atomic number of 3. Read more about Lithium

Highest sources of lithium in micrograms per kilogram

  • Milk 7533 g

  • Eggs 7373 g

  • Tomatoes 6707 g

  • Mushrooms 5788 g

  • Cucumbers 5017 g

  • Pork 3844 g

  • Black tea 3737 g

  • Red cabbage 3579 g

  • Cauliflower 3462 g

  • Beef 3428 g

  • Swede 2966 g

  • Paprika 2316 g

  • Poultry 2379 g

  • Marjoram 2289 g

  • Soft cheese 2276 g

  • Asparagus 2217 g

  • White cabbage 1874 g

  • Herring 1734 g

  • Cocoa 1728 g

  • Potatoes 1592 g

  • Apples 1449 g

  • Rice 1260 g

  • Butter 1070 g

  • Cinnamon 1046 g

  • Barley 995 g

  • Wheat flour 905 g

  • Lentils 748 g

  • Semolina 538 g

  • Honey 527 g

  • Bananas 383 g

  • Red wine 329 g

  • White wine 305 g

NOTE:  One g is one microgram.

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See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

M

Magnesium

Magnesium is an essential mineral element with the atomic number 12.  Read more about Magnesium

Highest sources of magnesium in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Rice bran 781 mg

  • Basil, coriander, dill and sage 694 mg

  • Hemp seeds 640 mg

  • Pumpkin and squash seeds 535 mg

  • Raw cocoa 499 mg

  • Flaxseeds 392 mg

  • Brazil nuts 376 mg

  • Sesame seeds 353 mg

  • Sunflower seeds 346 mg

  • Chia seeds 335 mg

  • Chlorella 315 mg

  • Wheat germ 313 mg

  • Cashew nuts 292 mg

  • Almonds 268 mg

  • Caraway seeds 258 mg

  • Black strap molasses and dulse 242 mg

  • Buckwheat 231 mg

  • Spirulina 189 mg

  • Oats 177 mg

  • Durum wheat 144 mg

  • Macadamia nuts 130 mg

  • Adzuki beans 127 mg

  • Kelp 121 mg

  • Millet 114 mg

  • Kale 88 mg

  • Anchovies 69 mg

  • Amaranth 65 mg

  • Globe artichoke 60 mg

  • Okra and nettles 57 mg

  • Chestnuts 54 mg

  • Rocket 47 mg

  • Dates 43 mg

  • Plantain 37 mg

  • Lentils 36 mg

  • Butternut squash 34 mg

  • Coconut 32 mg

  • Potatoes with skin 30 mg

  • Passion fruit 29 mg

  • Savoy cabbage, halibut 28 mg

  • Bananas, rabbit 27 mg

  • Bread fruit, green beans 25 mg

  • Peas 24 mg

  • Raspberries 22 mg

  • Guava 22 mg

  • Blackberries 20 mg

  • Courgettes 18 mg

  • Kiwi fruit, fennel, figs 17 mg

  • Endive 15 mg

  • Cucumber, lettuce 13 mg

Manganese

Manganese is a micro-mineral with the atomic number of 25. Read more about Manganese

Highest sources of manganese in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Cloves 60.1 mg

  • Rice bran 14.2 mg

  • Pine nuts 8.8 mg

  • Mussels 6.8 mg

  • Hazelnuts 5.6 mg

  • Pumpkin seeds 4.5 mg

  • Whole wheat 2.1 mg

  • Cocoa beans 3.8 mg

  • Soya beans 2.2 mg

  • Sunflower seeds 1.9 mg

  • Cashew nuts and garlic 1.7 mg

  • Brewer’s yeast 0.08 mg (depending upon source)

  • Egg yolks 1.1 mg

  • Black beans 1.1 mg

  • Dried peas 0.39 mg

  • Kidney beans 0.2 mg

NOTE: Manganese is concentrated in the outer covering of nuts, in the green leaves of edible plants and green vegetables such as peas and runner beans.

Molybdenum

Molybdenum is a chemical element with the atomic number 42. Read more about Molybdenum

Natural sources of molybdenum

  • Almonds

  • Barley

  • Beans

  • Bell peppers

  • Brewers yeast

  • Carrots

  • Celery

  • Chia seeds

  • Cod

  • Cucumber

  • Dark green vegetables

  • Eggs

  • Fennel

  • Kombu seaweed

  • Legumes

  • Lentils

  • Lettuce (romaine)

  • Oats

  • Organ meats

  • Nuts

  • Peanuts

  • Peas

  • Rice (brown)

  • Sesame seeds

  • Tomatoes

  • Whole grains

  • Yoghurt

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See also The A-Z of organic nutrients

N

Nickel

Nickel is a mineral element with the atomic number of 28. Read more about Nickel

Natural sources of nickel in alphabetical order

  • Anchovies

  • Barley

  • Buckwheat

  • Hazelnuts

  • Hemp seeds

  • Herring

  • Legumes

  • Lentils

  • Oats

  • Oysters

  • Peas

Nitrogen

Nitrogen is a chemical element with the atomic number of 7 and vital to all life on earth. Read more about Nitrogen

Natural sources of nitrogen

  • Algae and seaweed

  • Asparagus

  • Beef

  • Brewers yeast

  • Broccoli

  • Legumes

  • Lentils

  • Lettuce

  • Kelp

  • Nuts

  • Mushrooms

  • Oily fish

  • Organ meats

  • Rabbit

  • Shellfish

  • Spinach

  • Venison

  • Whole grains

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P

Phosphorus

Phosphorus is a mineral element with the atomic number of 15. Read more about Phosphorus

Highest sources of phosphorous in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Baking powder 6869 mg

  • Pumpkin seeds 1233 mg

  • Whey powder 932 mg

  • Poppy seeds 849 mg

  • Mustard seeds 828 mg

  • Parmesan cheese 807 mg

  • Brazil nuts 725 mg

  • Raw cocoa powder 734 mg

  • Soya beans 637 mg

  • Cashew nuts 593 mg

  • Beef liver 497 mg

  • Sardines 490 mg

  • Caviar 356 mg

  • Tempeh 266 mg

  • Sun dried tomatoes 356 mg

  • Brown rice 360 mg

  • Buckwheat 319 mg

  • Dried shiitake mushrooms 294 mg

  • Anchovies 252 mg

  • Portobello mushrooms 108 mg

  • White mushrooms 105 mg

  • Water cress 60 mg

Platinum

Platinum is the rarest and purest precious metal in the world with the atomic number of 78. Read more about Platinum

Highest sources of platinum

  • Algae and seaweed

  • Eggs

  • Hemp seeds

  • Kelp

  • Oily fish

  • Organ meats

  • Rabbit

  • Venison

  • Whole grains

Potassium

Potassium has the atomic number of 19 and is essential to the life of every cell of a living being and is among the most generously and widely distributed of all the tissue minerals. Read more about Potassium

See also:

Highest sources of potassium in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Dried basil, chervil, coriander, dill, parsley 4240 mg

  • Sun dried tomatoes 3427 mg

  • Turmeric 2,525 mg

  • Raw cocoa 2509 mg

  • Whey powder 2289 mg

  • Paprika and chilli powder 2280 mg

  • Yeast extract 2100 mg

  • Soya beans 1,797 mg

  • Cumin 1,788 mg

  • Fennel seeds 1,694 mg

  • Rice bran 1,485 mg

  • Black strap molasses 1464 mg

  • Kidney beans 1,406

  • Dried soya beans 1364 mg

  • Spirulina 1,363 mg

  • Coriander seeds 1,267 mg

  • Apricots dried 1,162 mg

  • Rabbit stewed 1026 mg

  • Pistachio nuts 1007 mg

  • Squash and pumpkin seeds 919 mg

  • Chick peas 875 mg

  • Sunflower seeds 850 mg

  • Raisins 749 mg

  • Prunes 732 mg

  • Almonds 705 mg

  • Dates 696 mg

  • Whelks 694 mg

  • Dried figs 680 mg

  • Cashew nuts 660 mg

  • Peanut butter 649 mg

  • Clams 628 mg

  • Watermelon seeds 648 mg

  • Pine nuts 597 mg

  • Chestnuts 592 mg

  • Spinach raw 558 mg

  • Anchovies 544 mg

  • Baked potatoes 535 mg

  • Coriander leaves 521 mg

  • Mackerel 520 mg

  • Breadfruit 490 mg

  • Avocados 485 mg

  • Sweet potato baked 475 mg

  • Sesame seeds 468 mg

  • Spinach boiled 466 mg

  • Walnuts 441mg

  • Soya sauce 435 mg

  • Black beans 431 mg

  • Cinnamon 431 mg

  • Pork 423 mg

  • Potatoes 421 mg

  • Guava 417 mg

  • Fennel 414 mg

  • Bulgur wheat 410 mg

  • Garlic 401 mg

  • Brussel sprouts (juiced raw) 389 mg

  • Lentils cooked 369 mg

  • Salmon 363 mg

  • Bananas 358 mg

  • Coconut 356 mg

  • Nutmeg 350 mg

  • Passion fruit 348 mg

  • Green chilli peppers 340 mg

  • Sweet potatoes 337 mg

  • Venison 335 mg

  • Watercress 330 mg

  • Carrots 320 mg

  • Bass 328 mg

  • Red chilli peppers 322 mg

  • Black currants 322 mg

  • Mushrooms 318 mg

  • Brussel sprouts boiled 317 mg

  • Kiwi fruit 316 mg

  • Lamb 310 mg

  • Beef lean 318 mg

  • Cannellini beans 307 mg

  • Sweet corn 287 mg

  • Bread bread 285 mg

  • Butternut squash baked 284 mg

  • Soda bread 266 mg

  • Coconut milk 263 mg

  • Apricots 259 mg

  • Coconut water 250 mg

  • Peas 240 mg

  • Sweet potato boiled 230 mg

  • Chicken 223 mg

  • Goat's milk 204 mg

  • Orange juice 200 mg

  • Grapes 191 mg

  • Peaches 190 mg

  • Oranges 181 mg

  • Clementine's 177 mg

  • Bell pepper green raw 175 mg

  • Cabbage 170 mg

  • Bell peppers green (boiled) 166 mg

  • Blackberries 162 mg

  • Plums 157 mg

  • Raspberries 151 mg

  • Milk semi-skimmed 150 mg

  • Onions 146 mg

  • Cauliflower boiled 142 mg

  • Yoghurt 141 mg

  • Lemon 138 mg

  • Grapefruit 135 mg

  • Butternut squash boiled 133 mg

  • Milk (whole) 132 mg

  • Sour dough bread 128 mg

  • Eggs 126 mg

  • White bread 115 mg

  • Balsamic vinegar 112 mg

  • Apples 107 mg

  • Cottage cheese 104 mg

  • Blueberries 77 mg

  • Apple cider vinegar mg

  • Oats 61 mg

  • Cous cous 58 mg

  • Honey 52 mg

  • Brown rice 43 mg

  • Butter 24 mg

  • Pasta 24 mg

  • White rice 20 mg

  • Tofu 20 mg

Search for a mineral

 

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R

Rhodium

Rhodium is a chemical element with the atomic number 45. Read more about Rhodium

Natural sources of rhodium

  • Almonds

  • Carrots

  • Flaxseed oil

  • Grape seeds

  • Green tea

  • Shiitake mushrooms

  • Watercress

Rubidium

Rubidium is a mineral element with the atomic number 37 that is present in the earth's crust, in seawater and in the human body. Read more about Rubidium

Natural sources of rubidium

  • Algae and seaweed

  • Apricots

  • Asparagus

  • Beetroot

  • Bilberries

  • Brazil nuts

  • Cashew nuts

  • Dandelion leaves

  • Himalayan salt crystals

  • Mineral water

  • Parsley

  • Rhubarb

  • Spinach

  • Tea

  • Sea salt (unrefined)

 

Search for a mineral

 

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S

Selenium

Selenium is a mineral element with the atomic number 34. Read more about Selenium

Highest sources of selenium in micrograms per 100 grams

  • Brazil nuts 1917 g

  • Oysters 154 g

  • Lamb's liver 116 g

  • Tuna 108 g

  • Whelks and octopus 89.6 g

  • Wheat germ 79.2 g

  • Sunflower seeds 79 g

  • Amaranth 70.7 g

  • Caviar (fish roe) 65.5 g

  • Anchovies 68.1 g

  • Egg yolk 56 g

  • Chia seeds 55.2 g

  • Kippers 52.6 g

  • Pork 51.6 g

  • Halibut 46.8 g

  • Oat bran 45.2 g

  • Lean beef 44.8 g

  • Crab 44.4 g

  • Salmon 41.4 g

  • Rabbit (wild) 38.5 g

  • Chicken and turkey 37.8 g

  • Turbot 36.5 g

  • Sesame seeds 34.4 g

  • Kamut 30 g

  • Couscous 27.5 g

  • Mushrooms (Crimini) 26 g

  • Cashew nuts 19.9 g

  • Calf's liver 19.3 g

  • Rabbit 15.2 g

  • Rye (whole grain) 13.9 g

  • Venison 10.3 g

  • Spirulina 7.2 g

  • Asparagus 6.1 g

  • Spinach 5.5 g

 

Silica

Silica is a chemical element with the atomic number of 14 that is known as a tetravalent metalloid. Read more about Silica

Natural sources of silica

  • Almonds

  • Apples

  • Asparagus

  • Bamboo shoots

  • Beetroot

  • Cherries

  • Cucumber

  • Grapes

  • Honey

  • Horsetail

  • Juices and green leaves of most vegetables

  • Mineral water

  • Onions

  • Peanuts

  • Radishes

  • Yams

Silver

Silver is a mineral element with the atomic number of 47. Colloidal silver is reputed to have many health benefits. Read more about Silver

Sodium

Sodium is a mineral element with the atomic number 11. Sodium chloride, the chemical name for common salt, contains 39 per cent of sodium, an element which never occurs in free form in nature. It is found in an associated form with many minerals especially in plentiful amounts with chlorine. Read more about Sodium

Hypernatraemia

 

This is associated with dehydration, and instead of having too much sodium, there is too little water. Read more

 

Hyponatraemia 

 

This is caused by water intoxication (drinking so much water that it dilutes the sodium in the blood and overwhelms the kidney's compensation mechanism) Read more

Highest sources of sodium in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Table salt 38758 mg

  • Bicarbonate of soda 27360 mg

  • Stock cubes 24000 mg

  • Soya sauce 5586 mg

  • Chilli powder 4000 mg

  • Miso 3728 mg

  • Anchovies 3668 mg

  • Yeast extract 2962 mg

  • Capers 2769 mg

  • Processed meats (salami etc) 2260 mg

  • Processed cheese 1798 mg

  • Caviar 1500 mg

  • Crab 1072 mg

  • Spirulina 1048 mg

  • Whey 1079 mg

  • Margarine 943 mg

  • Olives 735 mg

  • Salted peanuts 667 mg

Strontium

Strontium is a mineral element with the atomic number 38 that was discovered in 1808 and was named after Strontian, a town in Scotland. It is one of the most abundant elements on earth, comprising about 0.04 percent of the earth's crust and has some very beneficial properties for the human body. Read more about Strontium

Natural sources of strontium

  • Algae and seaweed

  • Cabbage

  • Goat's milk

  • Lettuce

  • Onions

  • Mineral water

  • Octopus

  • Oily fish

  • Root vegetables

  • Shellfish

Sulphur

All living matter contains some sulphur; this element is therefore essential for life. It is critical to many of the body's biological processes and, without adequate sulphur, glucose metabolism is inhibited and this can lead to metabolic syndrome, low energy levels, weight gain and muscle and skeletal disorders which causes inflammation and pain. Read more about Sulphur

Highest sources of sulphur in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Scallops 520 mg

  • Lobster 510 mg

  • Crab 470 mg

  • Prawns 370 mg

  • Mussels 350 mg

  • Haddock 290 mg

  • Brazil nuts 290 mg

  • Peanuts 260 mg

  • Cod 250 mg

  • Oysters 250 mg

  • Chicken livers 250 mg

  • Cheese (parmesan) 250 mg

  • Caviar (fish roe) 240 mg

  • Peaches (dried) 240 mg

  • Cheese (cheddar or stilton) 230 mg

  • Salmon 220 mg

  • Beef 220 mg

  • Eggs 200 mg

  • Apricots (dried) 160 mg

  • Almonds 150 mg

  • Rabbit 130 mg

  • Walnuts 100 mg

  • Peppercorns 100 mg

  • Cabbage 90 mg

  • Spinach 90 mg

  • Brussel sprouts 80 mg

  • Chickpeas 80 mg

  • Figs (dried) 80 mg

  • Coconut 80 mg

  • Hazel nuts 80 mg

  • Mung beans 60 mg

  • Dates 50 mg

  • Split peas 50 mg

  • Onions 50 mg

  • Leeks 50 mg

  • Radishes 40 mg

Search for a mineral

 

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T

TIN

Tin is a trace mineral element with the atomic number of 50 and some animals do not grow well without it. Although it has been said that there is no known biological function of tin in the human body there have been studies that suggest it could have a function in the tertiary structure of proteins or other bio-substances and the human body does have receptors for it. Read more about Tin

Natural sources of tin

  • Algae and seaweed

  • Barberry

  • Beef

  • Bilberry

  • Blessed thistle (herb)

  • Brewer's yeast (dependent upon source, check label)

  • Couch grass (herb)

  • Devils claw (herb)

  • Dulse (algae)

  • Eggs

  • Irish moss (algae)

  • Juniper

  • Kelp (seaweed)

  • Lady slipper (herb)

  • Liquorice root (herb)

  • Marshmallow root (herb)

  • Milk

  • Milk thistle (herb)

  • Nettles

  • Organ meats

  • Pennyroyal (herb)

  • Rabbit

  • Red clover (herb)

  • Senna (herb)

  • Shellfish

  • Valerian (herb)

  • Vegetables

  • Whole grains

  • Yarrow (herb)

  • Yellow dock root (herb)

Search for a mineral

 

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V

Vanadium

Vanadium is a mineral element with the atomic number 23. Read more about Vanadium

Natural sources of vanadium in alphabetical order

  • Black pepper

  • Dill

  • Kelp

  • Kombu seaweed

  • Mushrooms

  • Parsley

  • Shellfish

  • Sumac

  • Wine

  • Whole grains

Search for a mineral

 

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Z

Zeolite

“Zeolites” refers to a group of silicate minerals that share a similar chemical composition, mineral associations and geologic occurrences. Naturally occurring clinoptilolite is a zeolite that has been used for over 800 years in traditional medicine in its raw form in places like India, China and Russia. In other countries it is used in air purification, animal feed, water filtration and in fertilisers to improve the health of crops.

Zeolite is a negatively charged, crystalline structure formed from the fusion of volcanic lava and ocean water. The molecules in zeolite contain a magnetic energy that attracts and holds several types of toxins at a molecular level which, taken orally, pull metals out of body tissues and into the zeolite itself. It is then passed safely through the urinary tract, without depleting the body of essential electrolytes.

Zeolite also blocks viral replication, does not disrupt the electrolytes in the body and naturally establishes an optimal pH level (between 7.35 and 7.45), which activates healthy brain, immune and liver function and supports the elimination of pesticides, herbicides and xeno-oestrogens. This makes zeolite especially suitable as a detoxifying agent as it can remove common heavy metals like aluminium, arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury from the body which can help with the treatment and prevention of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. This can potentially help to heal a range of toxicity-related inflammatory diseases, including dementia, while supporting (not burdening) the body’s excretory systems.

Zeolite is available in powdered or liquid form. The liquid zeolite is up to 10 times more efficient than the powdered form.

Zinc

Zinc is the healing mineral with the atomic number of 30 and is part of the enzymes that helps the body to metabolise protein, carbohydrates and alcohol. It also aids in building bones and healing wounds. Read more about Zinc

Highest sources of zinc in milligrams per 100 grams

  • Oysters 78.6 mg

  • Chlorella 71 mg

  • Wheat germ 16.7 mg

  • Beef 12.3 mg

  • Calf's liver 11.9 mg

  • Hemp seeds 11.5 mg

  • Pumpkin and squash seeds 10.3 mg

  • Sesame and watermelon seeds 10.2 mg

  • Bamboo shoots, endives and gourds 9 mg

  • Chervil (herb) 8.8 mg

  • Lamb 8.7 mg

  • Venison 8.6 mg

  • Alfalfa seeds (sprouted), amaranth leaves, Crimini mushrooms, Irish moss and tea 8 mg

  • Crab 7.6 mg

  • Lobster 7.3 mg

  • Agave, basil, broccoli, buffalo, elk, emu, oats, ostrich, spinach and turkey 7 mg

  • Cocoa powder 6.8 mg

  • Cashew nuts 5.8 mg

  • Asparagus, chicken livers, laver seaweed, mushrooms, parsley and rice bran 5.7 mg

  • Cashew nuts 5.6 mg

  • Pork 5.1 mg

  • Jute (herb), lemon grass, mung beans, Portobello mushrooms, radishes and shiitake mushrooms 5 mg

  • Agar seaweed, butterbur, cauliflower, chicory, Chinese cabbage, chives, coriander, green beans, lentils, lettuce, okra, rocket, spring onions, summer squash, Swiss chard, tomatoes and wasabi (yellow) 3.4 mg

  • Peanuts 3.3 mg

  • Cheddar cheese 3.1 mg

  • Mozzarella cheese 2.9 mg

  • Anchovies and rabbit 2.4 mg

  • Cabbage, cucumber, jalapeno peppers, , kidney beans, navy beans, spirulina and turnip greens 2 mg

  • Mussels 1.6 mg

  • Arrowroot, artichokes (globe), beetroot, bell peppers, black eyed peas, borage, broad beans, Brussel sprouts, butter beans, cabbage, carrots, celery, chilli peppers, courgettes, dandelion greens, garlic, horseradish, kale, kelp, mustard greens, peas, pinto beans, potatoes, pumpkin, turnips, Swede, sweet potato, tomatoes (red),  wakame (seaweed), watercress and winged beans 1.2 mg

OTHER MINERAL ELEMENTS

The body contains trace amounts of many of the following elements but their purposes are not yet fully understood.

  • Actinium (89)

  • Americium (95)

  • Antimony (51)

  • Argon (18)

  • Arsenic (33)

  • Astatine (85)

  • Berkelium (97)

  • Beryllium (4)

  • Bohrium (107)

  • Californium (98)

  • Cerium (58)

  • Curium (96)

  • Darmstadtium (110)

  • Dubnium (105)

  • Dysprosium (66)

  • Einsteinium (99)

  • Erbium (68)

  • Europium (63)

  • Francium (87)

  • Fermium (100)

  • Gadolinium (64)

  • Gallium (31)

  • Hafnium (72)

  • Hassium (108)

  • Helium (2)

  • Holmium (67)

  • Indium (49)

  • Krypton (36)

  • Lanthanum (57)

  • Lawrencium (103)

  • Lead (82)

  • Lutetium (71)

  • Meitnerium (109)

  • Mendelevium (101)

  • Moscovium (Ununpentium) (115)

  • Neodymium (60)

  • Neon (10)

  • Neptunium (93)

  • Nihonium (Ununtrium) (113 )

  • Niobium (41)

  • Nobelium (102)

  • Oganesson (Ununoctium) (118)

  • Osmium (76)

  • Palladium (46)

  • Plutonium (94)

  • Polonium (84)

  • Praseodymium (59)

  • Protactinium (91)

  • Promethium (61)

  • Radium (88)

  • Radon (86)

  • Rhenium (75)

  • Roentgenium (111)

  • Ruthenium (44)

  • Rutherfordium (104)

  • Samarium (62)

  • Scandium (21)

  • Seaborgium (106)

  • Tantalum (73)

  • Technetium (43)

  • Tellurium (52)

  • Tennessine (Ununseptium) (117)

  • Terbium (65)

  • Thallium (81)

  • Thorium (90)

  • Thulium (69)

  • Titanium (22)

  • Tungsten (74)

  • Uranium (92)

  • Ununbium copernicium (112)

  • Ununhexium livermorium (116)

  • Unuhectium (116)

  • Ununquadium flerovium (114)

  • Xenon (54)

  • Ytterbium (70)

  • Yttrium (39)

  • Zirconium (40)

NOTE: There are many other mineral compounds being discovered by scientists every year and the list is far too numerous to add here.

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